Tag: genetics

Diabetes Type 2

Diabetes Type 2

  Written by Dr. Claire Arcidiacono, ND For further questions or concerns email me at carcidiacono@invitehealth.com† Last week we talked about prediabetes. While not all people with diabetes type 2 first present with prediabetes, in my clinical experience many people do. Likewise while not everyone with 

BREAST CANCER AWARENESS: Genes, Genetics & Hormones

BREAST CANCER AWARENESS: Genes, Genetics & Hormones

  BREAST CANCER AWARENESS~ GENES, GENETICS and HORMONES By: Allie Might, FMC, INHC, ATT For further questions or concerns email me at amight@invitehealth.com When the subject of breast cancer comes up, there’s so many terms that are often mentioned. Any of these can seem confusing, as 

BREAST CANCER AWARENESS “PREVENTION” AND EARLY DETECTION

BREAST CANCER AWARENESS “PREVENTION” AND EARLY DETECTION

 

BREAST CANCER AWARENESS “PREVENTION” AND EARLY DETECTION
Written by: Allie Might, FMC, INHC, ATT

For further questions or concerns email me at amight@invitehealth.com

Since October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, I wanted to take time over the next few weeks to discuss this important topic. We’ll discuss areas such as Genes/Genetics, Metastatic Breast Cancer and what supplements work with the traditional treatments recommended by a doctor/oncologist. But first, I want to go over something that I’m asked about, “Is Breast Cancer Preventable?”

There’s a lot of research done on breast cancer. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) offers a plethora of information and guidelines. Some of these show us that while breast cancer isn’t preventable, there’s things we can do that may help to reduce the risk factors associated with this type of cancer. A few of these suggestions include maintaining a healthy weight, avoiding or consuming alcohol in moderation and breastfeeding your child. I like to recommend incorporating a   healthy diet of whole foods and avoiding processed foods and sugar.

TARGETED NUTRIENTS TO SUPPORT BREAST HEALTH>>READ NOW!

The CDC also recommends regular screenings of the breasts for monitoring overall breast health as well as making it easier for earlier detection. These screenings typically start with monthly self-breast exams. If you aren’t currently doing monthly self-exam, I strongly encourage every woman to start. This step by step guide will help you feel comfortable with this process.

https://www.breastcancer.org/screening-testing/breast-self-exam-bse

If you find anything during your monthly self-exam that seems suspicious, call your doctor right away for an appointment. Some of the signs to look for include, but not limited to the following:

discharge from the nipple
lumps
pain or discomfort
misshapen or discoloration

At this point, your doctor will have the chance to evaluate your concern and may need to order in depth testing. This could include routine/additional mammograms or possibly an MRI.

The CDC has also charted guidelines as recommended for screenings and how often they should be done. These are charted according to age group as well as whether or not one has dense breasts. This occurs when the breast is made up of more fibrous or granular tissues instead of fatty tissues.

https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/breast/pdf/breast-cancer-screening-guidelines-508.pdf

As you can see, the CDC has shown the recommendations for screenings according to such groups as The American Cancer Society, The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and The American College of Radiology.

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The guidelines set up and recommended by the CDC are set up to help with the early detection of breast cancer. As we’ve learned, eating a healthy diet, doing monthly self-breast exams and partnering with your doctor for routine mammograms can help support healthy breast tissues.

SOURCES

https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/breast/basic_info/screening.htm
https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/breast/pdf/breast-cancer-screening-guidelines-508.pdf
https://www.breastcancer.org/screening-testing/breast-self-exam-bse

Targeted Nutrients to Support Breast Health

Targeted Nutrients to Support Breast Health

Dr.Kay talks about decreasing breast cancer risk, and supporting the breast tissue with diet and nutritional supplements.

What Is Iron Overload? – InVite Health Podcast, Episode 437

What Is Iron Overload? – InVite Health Podcast, Episode 437

Did you know that your body can have too much iron? When this occurs, it can be toxic to your organs. The good news is there are nutrients that can help regulate iron levels within the body.

What to Take If You Need an X-Ray or CT Scan – InVite Health Podcast, Episode 421

What to Take If You Need an X-Ray or CT Scan – InVite Health Podcast, Episode 421

X-ray

InViteⓇ Health Podcast, Episode hosted by Amanda Williams, MPH

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If you’ve ever had to have an X-ray or a CT scan done, you’ve probably had the thought in the back of your mind if this is safe. Today I want to talk a little bit about what we do know when it comes to that radiation exposure and what risks are actually involved, whether we have to go in for dental X-rays, chest X-rays or CT scan.†

How common are X-ray tests?

It’s estimated that in this country alone, we probably do over 100 million regular X-rays of the chest or bones every single year. When it comes to CT scans, we’re looking at probably over 80 million CT scans that are conducted each and every single year. When we look at the dental X-rays, this is over a billion conducted every single year in the United States. That’s a lot of radiation exposure that we can put ourselves at risk for.†   

Considering how common these tests are, we have to be aware of the potential risks. We know that there is a dose-dependent adverse effect of X-rays that has been linked to cancers. Many researchers have been studying that particular cancer risk in both adults and children. It’s estimated that radiation exposure during medical imaging can be associated with 2% of all cancers in the United States.†    

Studies have shown that exposure to ionizing radiation from X-rays can be very problematic. This is because of DNA damage, which can result in a DNA mutation that can then lead to cancer further down the road.† 

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Nutrients that can help protect your body from the effects of radiation

When it comes to oxidative stress and cellular damage, we have to think about antioxidants. Let’s run through the basics of nutrients you should be considering taking when it comes to your exposure to X-rays and CT scans.†

We know that antioxidants are going to be important when we have to shield ourselves from the danger of the radiation. We can look at things such as EGCG. Those polyphenols that come from green tea have been shown to be very beneficial when it comes to fending off the damaging effects of radiation. Quercetin is also beneficial for this purpose. All of these nutrients are things that we should be considering if we are going in for an X-ray or CT scan.†

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We can certainly look at curcumin, which offers a kind of dual-action. It is working as an antioxidant to protect normal tissue, but it is also working in terms of the upregulation of genes that are responsible for cell death and cancers. This is why I generally include Bio-Curcumin 5-Loxin into a regimen if someone is going in for one of these tests.†      

Other nutrients such as ginkgo biloba, ginseng extract and silymarin extract have also been studied for their radioprotective properties.†

In this episode, Amanda Williams, MPH discusses the potential dangers of radiation from common medical tests. She explains how this can be related to cancer and offers suggestions for nutrients that can help fend off this damage.†

Key Topics:

  • Why might you need an X-ray or CT scan?
  • Research on the different types of radiation
  • When is it okay to get an X-ray or CT scan?