Tag: Women’s Multivitamin

Are Daily Multivitamin’s Important? – InVite Health Podcast, Episode 561

Are Daily Multivitamin’s Important? – InVite Health Podcast, Episode 561

When should we start to take multivitamin’s and which multivitamin is beneficial to take at what age? So many questions involving multi’s so learn more now!

The Adrenal Glands Take A Part In Thyroid Function

The Adrenal Glands Take A Part In Thyroid Function

What are adrenal glands and the connection of them to our thyroid health? To find out more on this topic read more from Dr. Claire Arcidiacono, ND blog post!

Top Five Supplements To Promote Overall Health – InVite Health Podcast, Episode 542

Top Five Supplements To Promote Overall Health – InVite Health Podcast, Episode 542

Overall Health

 

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Please see below for a complete transcript of this episode.

Top Five Supplements To Support Overall Health – InViteⓇ Health Podcast, Episode 542

Hosted by Melissa Bistricer, RDN

*Intro music*

InViteⓇ Health Podcast Intro: Welcome to the InViteⓇ Health Podcast, where our degreed healthcare professionals are excited to offer you the most important health and wellness information you need to make informed choices about your health. You can learn more about the products discussed in each of these episodes and all that InViteⓇ Health has to offer at www.invitehealth.com/podcast. First time customers can use promo code PODCAST at checkout for an additional 15% off your first purchase. Let’s get started!

*Intro music*

Melissa Bistricer, RDN: [00:38] Welcome back to another podcast at InViteⓇ Health. You have probably heard that vitamins and minerals are important in your body. Today we’ll be talking about supplements to promote overall health. Deficiencies in these supplements can lead to negative impacts. So I wanted to talk a little bit more about the importance, the science and how it works in the human body, all of its functions, and what we can do to support taking multivitamins, Vitamin D3, magnesium, omega-3 fatty acid and CoQ10 the Ubiquinol form.† [01:08] My name is Melissa Bistricer, I am a registered dietitian. I am so excited to bring to you the nutritional aspect of nutrients here at InViteⓇ Health. Nutrition, Food for thought: Time and health are two precious assets that we don’t recognize and appreciate until they have been depleted. Overall, health is extremely important now do not wait till it is too late. InViteⓇ Health promotes an integrative approach and providing vitamins into your daily life to increase your quality of life in conjunction with nutrients. It is also important to learn and include other lifestyle modifications like nutrition, exercise and sleep. These practices with the use of vitamins will promote optimal benefit in your daily life.†[01:52]

[01:53] Now let’s get on to talking about the five most important nutritional supplements to take for overall health. This can support individuals looking to maintain a healthy lifestyle through the use of supplements. But remember, diet is extremely important as well. Let’s dive deeper into the nutritional supplement that will benefit overall health. The core five are good quality InViteⓇ health multivitamins, vitamin D3, magnesium, omega-3 fatty acid and coenzyme Q10 the Ubiquinol form. † [02:24]

[02:24] Let’s start by talking about multivitamins. We know that multivitamins are used to fill nutritional gaps to make sure people are getting their daily intake of essential nutrients and aren’t under consuming these nutrients. A multivitamin is supplementing the nutrients that we are not getting enough of through food and may be deficient in which can cause serious illnesses, poor nutrition, digestive disorders and other health conditions. Multivitamins are micronutrients made up of vitamins and minerals that are essential for the body. They can not be produced in the body and therefore need to be consumed from outside sources such as foods that we eat or being supplemented.† [03:04]

[03:05] The typical American diet does not resemble what dietitians and experts recommend for fruits and vegetables and whole grains, which has very important vitamins and minerals. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recommended getting essential micronutrients while eating a variety of a healthy, balanced diet. This is important to be realistic, and even if a diet is planned, well, it is not possible for every single person to choose foods containing the correct recommended amount that are essential micronutrients and they may fall short. However, it is hard to assume the population will get all their nutrients from food. As individuals, diets are lacking in the intake of vegetables, fruit and whole grains. With time consuming, a poor diet may result in several deficiencies leading to serious health conditions. Over time research has been done to assess the use of multivitamins and minerals to improve health. The vitality and utility of taking a multivitamin and minerals supplement has helped to fill small but crucial nutritional gaps. That have helped to prevent conditions such as anemia, neural tube defects and osteoporosis. There has been some evidence suggesting the use of multivitamins in regard to preventing cancer and the prevention of delayed cataracts and aspects of cognitive function as well.† [04:23]

[04:23] The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey about half of the non industrialized civilians living in the US are taking a dietary supplement such as the most common one is a multivitamin mineral. The Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 clarifies that supplements are for supplementing the diet and not for preventing or treating a disease. Again, that is extremely important to understand that supplements are for supplementing the diet and not for preventing or treating a disease. Therefore, let’s get into the details about why our supplements here at InViteⓇ Health are so unique and the benefits of purchasing them is that there are no synthetic products added, they are scientifically formulated under the cGMP, which stands for current good manufacturing practices.† [05:11]

[05:12] The Multivitamins support energy, vision and nutrient depletions. Our Core Multivitamin contains lutein and lycopene, which is specifically helping eye health that can help blue light damage and too much screen time. We all know how much we sit at the computers for multiple hours of the day, and these nutrients will help maintain the eye health from the blue light and screen time. The Men’s Multivitamin supports overall aging, sexual health, immunity, and vision. The Men’s has all the same nutrients as the Core Multi but has an additional four nutrients. It has quercetin, which is a flavonoid that supports respiratory circulation and prostate health. Black Cumin which helps lung metabolism and prostate health. Beta-Sitosterol helps healthy cholesterol levels and lastly, Maca helps to enhance endurance, mood level, sexual function and prostate health. The Women’s Multivitamin supports overall healthy vision, sexual health and energy. The Women’s has all the same nutrients as the Core Multi but has an additional four nutrients. It has iron bisglycinate, a gentle iron to not cause constipation or nausea. Collagen hydrolysate to support skin, hair, nails and joints. Purple Andean Corn Extract contains a flavonoids to help with the brain, eye, breast, and metabolism. And lastly DIM to help breast cervical health. The Performance Multivitamin has the same nutrients as the Core Multi but provides two additional nutrients that are powerful antioxidants. SOD and Rhodiola have performance enhancing nutrients to benefit any lifestyle. Specifically for athletes and individuals with diabetes.† [06:52]

WHY MULTIVITAMINS ARE SO ESSENTIAL TO YOUR HEALTH TODAY – INVITE HEALTH PODCAST, EPISODE 5 >> Listen Now!

[06:52] You may be thinking what is so unique about our multivitamins here at InViteⓇ health? They offer active forms of folate and methylcobalamin. This means the body has an easier time metabolizing these nutrient. The active form of folate supports protection of the brain, heart and cellular protection as well as the active form of Methylcobalamin, also known as B12, which is the active form to support nerve and brain health. † [07:18]

[07:18] 1-25 dihydroxy vitamin D3 is cholecalciferol the active form of vitamin D3. That is a lipid soluble compound that plays a significant role in calcium homeostasis and bone metabolism. Vitamin D naturally comes from sunlight, but with time, people are getting less sunlight, spending more time inside. According to Cleveland Clinical Mercy Hospital states that approximately 42% of US Americans are deficient in vitamin D. This can be because vitamin D comes from sunlight and from minimal food sources such as eggs or sardines. Most Americans are not getting enough sunlight and can have issues with prescribed medications depleting vitamin D stores leading to the need for supplementation. Vitamin D is needed in order for calcium to be absorbed in the body. Calcium is the main component of bone health. Therefore, vitamin D has to be present in the body to be able to absorb calcium. Vitamin D supplementation should be prescribed according to your lab value. If you are on the lower end of 20, then you may want to take the vitamin D3 3000 IU. If an individual only needs a maintenance dose, then they may just need the vitamin D3 1000 IU. Vitamin D dosing really depends on your lab value to assess the appropriate amount for your specific body needs. Low levels of vitamin D can lead to serious health conditions, especially as people age. We hear about the prevalence of the elderly breaking their hips or fracturing other bones. This can be due to the limited exposure to the sun as they age and not getting enough of the active form of vitamin D leading to more complications such as fractures or even worse, osteoporosis.† [09:04]

[09:06] According to the Science daily, if an individual does not have sufficient magnesium levels, then vitamin D cannot be metabolized. This means that vitamin D is stored and inactive for about 50% of Americans. Magnesium is important since it plays many different roles in the body. Magnesium is a cofactor in more than 300 enzymes that regulate diverse biochemical reactions in the body, including protein synthesis, muscle and nerve transmission, neuromuscular conduction, single transduction, blood glucose control, and blood pressure regulation. Magnesium is important for structural functions of proteins, nucleic acids, or mitochondria. Low levels of magnesium generally will not cause any issues, but severely low magnesium can increase the risk of high blood pressure, heart disease, type two diabetes, or osteoporosis. According to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey they report nearly half of Americans have inadequate intake from food or water of magnesium. Therefore, not consuming an estimated average of requirement of 350 milligrams depending on age and gender.† [10:14]

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[10:15] At InViteⓇ Health we have two ways you can buy magnesium, either magnesium glycine or magnesium citrate. Magnesium glycine is quickly absorbed and binds itself to a non essential amino acid called glycine and it is not proven to have a stool softener effect. Magnesium citrate provides a natural regulatory activity due to its strong bond to citric acid. This form attracts water and helps for the occasional constipation, causing diarrhea essentially. It is best to start low and slow it with magnesium supplementation as it can have a bowel softener effect for some individuals, starting with 200 milligrams at night and see how you feel and the intensity of the bowel movements then determine if you can increase or stay at 200 milligrams.† [11:02]

[11:02] Over the past 200 years, there has been an increase in scientific scrutiny on the public interest in omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3 fatty acids have been proven to help anti-inflammatory cytokines, antiarrhythmic, and antithrombotic properties. Fish and fish oils are high in omega-3 fatty acids specifically in EPA and DHEA, which are in fatty fish. Alpha lipoic acid, also known as ALA, is also an omega-3 fatty acid, but is discussed less due to alpha lipoic acid. Being a plant based product such as only in seeds, green leafy vegetables, nuts, and beans. Omega-3 are found in fish, which have been broken down in the form of EPA and DHA. While omega-3’s in plant foods may not have been, this essentially means the body will need to convert DHEA and EPA further. The reason why fish is the preferred form to get EPA and DHA is because it leads to more significant health benefits. This is because the EPA and DHA are generally found in foods, but in the Westernized diet, individuals are not getting a sufficient amount of omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3 fatty acids has the potential to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, reducing inflammation, and lowering triglyceride levels.† [12:23] 

[12:23] There are three options in InViteⓇ that provide you with the benefits without having to eat fish. If you really dislike it. There is the fish oils, krill, oil and flaxseed. Fish oils are derived from cold water, oily fish which have the best source of omega-3 fatty acid, EPA and DHA. This helps to support your brain, memory, mood, and cognition health. Krill Oil Advanced has Antarctic source shrimp that supplies DHA and EPA. The anthocyanins that are provided have powerful antioxidants that help to support heart health and inflammation. If you have an allergy to fish or shellfish, the alternative is to use the High Lignan Flaxseed Complex or the Organic Flaxseed Powder. Flaxseed supplies omega-3 fatty acids to support heart and brain as well as omega-6 and omega-9 fatty acids. Omega-6 supports immune health and omega-9 supports circulatory health. This is a great alternative to fish or krill oil. The dose for the fish, krill or the flaxseed complex are two capsules per day, and the organic flaxseed powder is between 1 to 3 scoops per day added either to yogurt or water. † [13:32]

[13:32] Lastly, let’s talk about the importance of CoQ10 and specifically the Ubiquinol form an energy source. The body naturally produces CoQ10, which is an antioxidant that helps with growth and maintenance. With age or certain medications such as statins, diuretics, blocking agents or acetaminophen like Tylenol the levels in your body start to decrease. Which can result in low energy, fatigue and other health concerns. Coenzyme Q10, which is Ubiquinol, is the preferred form as it is the reduced form of CoQ10, which is more absorbable and ubiquinone is an oxidized form. Ubiquinol is needed for energy, without Ubiquinol, you will not have energy in the body.† [14:15]

[14:16] The role of CoQ10 has shown to help in the mitochondrial coenzyme, which is essential for production of ATP. Otherwise simply known as our energy. Cardiac cells are extremely sensitive to the deficiency of CoQ10, which can be produced by cardiac diseases. Therefore, CoQ10 supplementation has the ability to help prevent and treat heart alignments to improve cellular bioenergetics. It has also helped to lower LDL oxidation and the progression of atherosclerosis. CoQ10 can also decrease pro-inflammatory cytokines, decrease body viscosity to help patients with heart failure or coronary heart disease. Significant improvements have been seen by taking CoQ10 with patients going through heart failure, hypertension, ischemia, heart disease, and other cardiac illnesses. The dosage for Ubiquinol is generally for the age of 40 years older under 60 milligrams is sufficient. If you are over 60 years old, 120 milligrams is sufficient depending on your health conditions as well. † [15:20]

SHOULD YOU USE COQ10 OR GINSENG FOR ENERGY? – INVITE HEALTH PODCAST, EPISODE 337 >> Listen Now! 

[15:20] Let us briefly talk a little bit more about the diet as the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recommend getting essential micronutrients while eating a variety of healthy, balanced diet. Again, we know that some people can eat a healthy diet and still need certain supplements to help ensure they are replenishing any nutrients that may be depleted based on lifestyle factors. A healthy overall diet is based on an intuitive eating mindset. Intuitive eating is defined as a non dieting approach to have a balanced diet. Some might be more familiar with following the “Choose My Plate” guidelines with three main concepts for you to remember and planning a healthy, balanced diet are the three P’s pick, plan, and portion. The idea is to pick healthy choices, prepare foods in the healthiest way and portion to make sure you are eating proper portion sizes that your body may need. A plate should look like a quarter of protein, a quarter of carbs. And lastly, the most important, a half of your plate should be non-starchy vegetables. Non-Starchy vegetables are examples are broccoli, carrots, zucchini, eggplant, or mushrooms. Key takeaways are that half of your carbs should come from whole grains, including vegetables, fruits of all different colors, and switching from fat free to low fat dairy products, drinking low calorie or no calorie beverages, choosing lean proteins versus high fat proteins and increasing physical activity.† [16:45]

[16:45] So getting exposure can come in different ways. My advice to you is to use one of our multivitamins, which has an excellent array of vitamins and minerals. Then we spoke about four other core vitamins to take daily, which is magnesium, vitamin D, fish oil or krill oil. And lastly, CoQ10, the Ubiquinol form. This can benefit your overall health and targets to benefit the multitude of pathways in the body. You can go check out the products sold here at invitehealth.com and if you have any further questions, you can always chat with myself as a nutritionist or any of our health care providers to assist you here at invitehealth.com or you can email me at mbistricer@invitehealth.com.† [17:24]

[00:17:24] I am Melissa Bistricer, RDN ready to share the knowledge to help you modify your lifestyle to live a happier, more successful life. I’m looking forward to continuing to provide you with educational podcasts and blog post, Again, nutrition, food for thought: Time and Health are two precious assets that we don’t recognize and appreciate until they have been depleted. Have a great day and tune in for the next podcast coming your way soon.† [17:24]

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Allie’s Top 10 Supplements

Allie’s Top 10 Supplements

Picking the right supplements for your goals can be daunting, but we’re here to help! Read now to see what Allie Might, INHC, recommends to get you started.

The Importance of Selenium – InVite Health Podcast, Episode 520

The Importance of Selenium – InVite Health Podcast, Episode 520

Selenium may be a micro mineral, but it is essential for important functions in the body such as immune defenses, heart health and more.

Getting to Know Zinc – InVite Health Podcast, Episode 516

Getting to Know Zinc – InVite Health Podcast, Episode 516

zinc

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Please see below for a complete transcript of this episode.

Getting to Know Zinc – InVite Health Podcast, Episode 516

Hosted by Amanda Williams, MPH

*Intro music*

InVite Health Podcast Intro: Welcome to the InVite Health Podcast, where our degreed healthcare professionals are excited to offer you the most important health and wellness information you need to make informed choices about your health. You can learn more about the products discussed in each of these episodes and all that InVite Health has to offer at www.invitehealth.com/podcast. First time customers can use promo code PODCAST at checkout for an additional 15% off your first purchase. Let’s get started!

*Intro music*

Amanda Williams, MPH:

[00:00:40] The human body comes naturally equipped with vitamins and minerals, and when we look at the second most abundant mineral in the body, this is zinc. Zinc is just behind iron when it comes to its total distribution found throughout our system. We certainly understand the importance of iron when it comes to the production of hemoglobin in the transport of oxygen. So when someone has low iron, this can lead to anemia, which can make people feel very fatigued or short of breath. So what happens if our second most abundant mineral happens to be on the low end, whether that be insufficient levels or deficient levels? That’s what I want to talk about today. I’m Amanda Williams, M.D., M.P.H., and let’s talk about zinc.† [00:01:24]

SIGNS & SYMPTOMS OF AN IRON DEFICIENCY – INVITE HEALTH PODCAST, EPISODE 62. Listen Now>>

[00:01:25] Zinc is really one of those overlooked minerals in our system because many times we just think about it in the setting of our immune system. And clearly we know that it is very, very important. If you have insufficient levels of zinc or deficient levels of zinc, we can see how this creates what is known as immunosenescence, or basically creating an environment to which the immune cells and the immune system in general begins to degrade or lose its strength. So we know that we need to have zinc. But what are some of the other things about zinc that you may not know? And that’s what I want to zero in on today. When it comes to the multiple functions of zinc in the body. And I want to make sure that I’m clear on this because zinc has a few different actions that we know what makes it so impactful throughout our entire body. When we understand that through the catalyzation of enzymes, so zinc is responsible for catalyzing over 100 different enzymes. But it’s not just limited to that because we can also recognize that we need zinc for more than 2000 different transcription factors when we’re looking at gene expression, meaning every day functions in the body are heavily reliant on zinc. So now we can see, OK, if we don’t have enough zinc, this can definitely impact not just our immune system, but we can start to see the spiraling effect.† [00:03:03]

[00:03:04] So let me walk through just the key basic functions of zinc. We know that when it comes to at the cellular level, we can categorize zinc into three different sections. One is its catalytic properties, one in terms of structural and the other for regulatory. So we know that there are so many different enzymes that depend on zinc for that ability to catalyze. I said over 100 different enzymes. So in the absence of adequate zinc, we are now going to have a problem for those enzymes to be able to do what they need to do. Big problem. Now let’s think about the structural role. We understand that zinc helps and aids in the folding of certain proteins in the body. We can see its impact when it comes to different receptors that our hormones attach to, so we can think of thyroid hormone. We can look at our sex hormones, we can look at our adrenal hormones, and now we can see why low levels of zinc have been implicated in a underactive thyroid because without adequate zinc, the thyroid hormone itself is going to struggle. So it’s really absolutely fascinating when we take a simple mineral and then we start to really expand that out and say, “Oh my goodness, we have to have zinc for this, for, for gene regulation and for enzymatic expression and for these regulatory roles.”†[00:04:49]

[00:04:50] So if we don’t have zinc, how is it that we can help at that cellular level for nerve transmission, for that hormonal influence, even when we think about metabolic syndrome and enhancing insulin sensitivity? Zinc, yes, plays a role into this as well. We can see the true impact of zinc when we think about those hormonal health. When you look at men and prostate health, they’ve been able to correlate how low levels of zinc have been detected in prostate cancer cells. So if the prostate cancer cells do not have adequate zinc, that means they can continue to thrive. Because remember, zinc is helping the healthy cells with their replication, whereas the cancer cells are not using that. So it’s really very profound the amount of data and the amount of science that is out there when it comes to how zinc works in the body.† [00:05:56]

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[00:05:56] And we can look at clear indications of zinc deficiency. And this is not as common as it once used to be. There used to be a lot of issues just because of malnutrition. And so you would see the worldwide prevalence of zinc deficiency was much more common many years ago. Now it’s not as common, however we can, we still see great rates or great prevalence of zinc insufficiency, and this can be problematic if we have inflammation. Inflammation in the intestines, for example. So we can look at things like ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, the different inflammatory bowel diseases that we know impact many people. We can certainly see how those who are following more of a vegetarian diet may need a greater intake of zinc. So it’s possible that you can have a zinc insufficiency, which can now lead to problems with pathways, enzymes, hormones. And this is why I want to talk about it outside of just thinking of it for the common cold and for our immune system. Now we know that when we’re looking at different micronutrient deficiencies and easily a good 10, 15% of the population certainly is not obtaining enough just from dietary intake alone, which once again can lead to issues with our vision health, with our cardiovascular health, with our neurological health and obviously with our immune system health. So it’s not something that we want to overlook. Interestingly, they, they’ve been able to connect those dots and see how the inadequate exposure to zinc in our diet, creating these deficiencies or insufficiencies, have been linked to age-related macular degeneration. Interesting, right? Because many times when we think about zinc, like I said, we stay in that lane of immune system, but we now can start to expand that out and say, “Wait. Zinc is dealing with the structural, the functional.”† [00:08:13]

[00:08:15] And of course, looking at the catalytic component to zinc. And that’s where it’s really very interesting, the fact that it is required for these enzymes. And if we don’t have adequate amounts, how problematic that actually becomes for us when we’re looking at eye health and age-related macular degeneration, we can see that the zinc is found in very high concentrations within our retina. And so if we have inadequate zinc throughout our lifetime, and we have this continued steady decline of zinc within the retina, this can be a exacerbator to the development of age-related macular degeneration. We certainly see the linkage between blood glucose and glycation that occurs in the body in the setting of type two diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Certainly, we know that zinc plays a role in the action of insulin coming from the B cells. So we think about the pancreatic B cells and the secretion of insulin. We know that zinc definitely is playing this key, an important role. When we think about our mood, when I said neurological but thinking about brain health, we can certainly now link the inadequate intake of zinc with issues such as depression and anxiety. So it’s an area that we want to make sure that you’re getting an exposure to, that you’re not getting too much, you know, too much of zinc, you don’t necessarily need more than probably 50mg of zinc per day between, you know, the different nutrients that you’re taking from your multivitamin. Plus, if you have an add on zinc formulation.† [00:10:07]

HBA1C: WHY IT MATTERS TO HEALTHY AGING – INVITE HEALTH PODCAST, EPISODE 515. Listen Now>>

[00:10:09] But you definitely want to make sure that you do not ignore zinc, because at the end of the day, we want to be able to fend off oxidative stress, and we know that zinc is a unique mineral in the fact that it has antioxidant properties. We understand that zinc is this key co-factor when it comes to the way that our body heals a wound healing. So anyone that’s going in to have a procedure, I always say, make sure you’re taking your zinc and your Vitamin C. This is really very important. At the very least, we want to be taking a multivitamin that has a chelated zinc in it, so if you’re looking at our Core Multivitamin, the Men’s, the Women’s or the Performance Multi. You can also look at adding additional zinc via doing the Zinc Picolinate. Or you can also do the Immunity HxⓇ, which is going to yield you that zinc exposure as well, because remember, zinc is responsible for all of these different functions and different enzyme reactions in those biochemical pathways. So when we think about the regulation of protein and DNA synthesis and our thyroid function and bone health and our immune system and fending off oxidative stress, so whether we’re having concerns with cardiovascular health, thyroid health, neurological, vision health, we definitely want to make sure that we do not overlook the second most abundant mineral in the body, which is zinc.† [00:11:42]

[00:11:43] So thank you so much for tuning in to the InViteⓇ Health Podcast. Remember, you can find all of our episodes for free wherever you listen to podcasts or by visiting invitehealth.com/podcast. Now do make sure that you subscribe and you leave a review. You can follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, and we will see you next time for another episode of the InViteⓇ Health Podcast.† [00:11:43]

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