Tag: Resveratrol

Targeted Nutrients for Endometriosis – InVite Health Podcast, Episode 431

Targeted Nutrients for Endometriosis – InVite Health Podcast, Episode 431

Ten percent of women suffer from endometriosis, a condition that occurs when endometrial cells begin to grow outside of the uterus. Studies have shown that there are nutrients that can help women who are dealing with this issue.

New Discoveries in Nutrition for Memory – InVite Health Podcast, Episode 388

New Discoveries in Nutrition for Memory – InVite Health Podcast, Episode 388

Researchers have indicated parts of the brain that are necessary for maintaining memory functions as we age. These studies have also looked at nutrients that can help to support and promote the brain as we grow older.

Summer and Autoimmune Disease Flare-Ups – InVite Health Podcast, Episode 378

Summer and Autoimmune Disease Flare-Ups – InVite Health Podcast, Episode 378

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InViteⓇ Health Podcast, Episode hosted by Jerry Hickey, Ph.

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There are about 80+ autoimmune diseases, diseases where your own immune system attacks your body and it can destroy your organs and tissues. For instance, in rheumatoid arthritis, your immune system attacks your joints, especially in your knuckles. This can deform your hands and cause swelling and severe pain.† 

It turns out that people with certain autoimmune diseases can experience flare-ups when exposed to a lot of humidity, heat or ultraviolet radiation from the sun. Examples of these diseases that flare-up in the sun would be psoriasis, scleroderma, dermatomyositis, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis. For some people with autoimmune diseases, the summer can be really rough because it can really trigger a flare-up that can make symptoms terrible.† 

HOW TO MANAGE ECZEMA AND PSORIASIS – INVITE HEALTH PODCAST, EPISODE 272. Listen Now>>

Can the sun trigger autoimmune disease flare-ups?

People who deal with autoimmune diseases such as lupus have reported that the sun can trigger flare-ups for them. Some symptoms that they have shared included rashes on their face and body, very red cheeks, itchy scalp, headaches and even difficulty breathing.†  

Dr. Jeffrey Carlin at the Benaroya Research Institute has explained that too much UV exposure can be toxic for anybody. When you get a bad sunburn, the sun kills cells on the surface of the skin. The body gets rid of these cells in a process called apoptosis, in which your cells basically self-destruct. This is followed by an immune response where white blood cells come in and get rid of the dead cells. This is when some people’s skin turns red and begins to peel until new, healthy cells replace the old ones.†

In people with autoimmune diseases, however, they have an overactive immune system, so when they are exposed to the sun and their skin cells go through apoptosis, it may trigger an immune reaction that’s too strong. Various immune cells are turned on, creating a total flare-up of the immune system that’s like throwing gasoline on a fire. Dr. Carlin said that this can cause people with lupus to have skin problems, as well as kidney issues, simply because their immune system went into overdrive and attacked healthy tissue.†

Protecting your body during the summer

If you suffer from an autoimmune disease, you have to be careful when you go out during the summer. You don’t want to take hot showers, you want to take cold showers. You don’t want to sunbathe. You don’t want to exercise outside on a really hot, humid day. You don’t want to use a sauna or a hot tub. Stay in the air conditioning and if you want to exercise, go swimming in a cool pool. Drink cold drinks and wear loose-fitting, lightweight clothing. Make sure to wear a broad spectrum sunscreen.†

There are also some supplements that can help with certain autoimmune diseases. Bio-Curcumin 5-Loxin comes at inflammation from two avenues. Resveratrol can be helpful for Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. This is an anti-inflammatory nutrient with small molecules that is very good for the thyroid. For rheumatoid arthritis, I recommend Cartilage HxⓇ, which contains undenatured Type II collagen and undenatured cartilage.†

A SUPERIOR ANTIOXIDANT: RESVERATROL – INVITE HEALTH PODCAST, EPISODE 45. Listen Now>>

In this episode, Jerry Hickey, Ph. discusses how the heat, humidity and sun of summer can impact people with autoimmune diseases. He also offers recommendations for nutrients and habits that can help protect the body.†

Key Topics:

  • Examples of autoimmune diseases
  • Reports on how the sun can trigger lupus and other autoimmune diseases
  • Who is more at risk of developing autoimmune diseases?
  • What happens to people with MS and lupus when exposed to the sun and heat

Thank you for tuning in to the InViteⓇ Health Podcast. You can find all of our episodes for free wherever you listen to podcasts or by visiting www.invitehealth.com/podcast. Make sure you subscribe and leave us a review! Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram at InViteⓇ Health today. We’ll see you next time on another episode of the InViteⓇ Health Podcast.

The Impact of Alcohol on the Immune System – InVite Health Podcast, Episode 371

The Impact of Alcohol on the Immune System – InVite Health Podcast, Episode 371

Overindulging in alcohol can negatively impact your immune system, leaving you at risk for developing colds, viruses or worse. Learn about how alcohol can suppress immune responses from Amanda Williams, MPH.

Cardiac Gene Variants and Cardiovascular Health – InVite Health Podcast, Episode 351

Cardiac Gene Variants and Cardiovascular Health – InVite Health Podcast, Episode 351

Your body contains a multitude of genes that are involved in your cardiovascular health. Understanding these genes can help indicate what you need to do to support your heart in terms of diet, exercise, supplementation and more.

The Impact of Alcohol On Your Heart – InVite Health Podcast, Episode 280

The Impact of Alcohol On Your Heart – InVite Health Podcast, Episode 280

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Invite Health Podcast, Episode hosted by Amanda Williams, MPH

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For decades now, we’ve been told that moderate consumption of things such as red wine can be very beneficial to our overall health. I want to talk about the true meaning of alcohol consumption, the different types of alcohol and the real cardiovascular impacts of alcohol consumption. On one hand, it has been proven that the polyphenols coming from the grapes that are then made into wine can be incredibly beneficial to the health of the heart and the entire cardiovascular system, but we also have to recognize that everything is in moderation. If we over-consume, then we go from a point of cardioprotective to cardiac detrimental.    

The French paradox: The Link Between Alcohol (Wine) and Heart Health

When we’re looking at the fermentation of different fruits, such as berries and grapes, we have to look at how beneficial these can actually be for the heart. We’re looking for antioxidants and polyphenols. We’re recognizing more and more how things like resveratrol are going to work in terms of fending off oxidative stress and down-regulating inflammation in the body.†  

We can look at the French paradox, which is the term that is coined for why it is that people in France seem to have this phenomenon where there’s a higher consumption of wine as part of their daily dietary intake that has led to this apparent cardioprotective potential. Everything in moderation, of course, because we know that excessive consumption of alcohol is actually incredibly detrimental to our cardiovascular system.†    

NUTRIENTS THAT OFFER OPTIMAL BLOOD PRESSURE SUPPORT – INVITE HEALTH PODCAST, EPISODE 263. Listen Now >>

In 2019, a study in the Addiction journal looked at alcohol use and disorders of the heart. The researchers were talking about how alcohol use is a preventable and modifiable cause of different diseases. They were looking at its effects on the cardiovascular system. Within this particular study, they were looking at different observational studies and drawing different links between alcohol consumption and cardiovascular disease. This included looking at the impact of alcohol on blood pressure and cardiomyopathies.† 

We know that small amounts of alcohol can have this really long-lasting benefit to the heart, but we also recognize that the balance is a very finite area. When we’re consuming too much, then we know that we are going to run into a problem and hence we have all of these additional impacts on overall cardiac function that can spiral out of control. The ethanol itself can have, at some degree, a beneficial effect on the function of the heart, but it can also have a very detrimental effect.†

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Tune into the full podcast episode to learn more about the beneficial and detrimental aspect of alcoholic beverages.  

Supplementing with polyphenols

Many scientists out there will say to avoid the alcohol path and just go with the actual polyphenols themselves. This would include supplementing with nutrients such as resveratrol or grape seed extract. In the Alcohol Research Journal, they discussed how the positive effects of drinking alcohol have to be weighed against the physiological effects, including mitochondrial dysfunction, changes in circulation and inflammatory responses, and oxidative stress, that are known to damage the cardiovascular system. If alcohol can on one hand offset that but on the other hand exacerbate it, how do we know where that balance is?†   

HELPING THE HEART STAY HEALTHY – INVITE HEALTH PODCAST, EPISODE 244. Listen Now >>

Based on the science, one glass of red wine per day would appear to be incredibly cardioprotective. However, that is under the assumption that you are having just that one glass, which is the difficult thing for most people. We don’t want to have the alcohol itself actually exacerbate pre-existing heart conditions.† 

Having polyphenols coming from your food or what you’re drinking, such as green tea and red wine, is beneficial because we know that these potent antioxidants do so much to fend off oxidative stress. But if we drink too much alcohol, then we cross over to that other side where we are then increasing our inflammation, creating more mitochondrial dysfunction and impeding the natural release of nitric oxide in the body. This is why I oftentimes will turn towards things such as straight resveratrol, grape seed extract or quercetin. We know that all of these nutrients can have long-lasting impacts in terms of cardiovascular benefits.† 

Thank you for tuning in to the Invite Health Podcast. You can find all of our episodes for free wherever you listen to podcasts or by visiting www.invitehealth.com/podcast. Make sure you subscribe and leave us a review! Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram at Invite Health today. We’ll see you next time on another episode of the Invite Health Podcast.

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